On Cryptographic Techniques for Digital Rights Management
Candidate: Nelly Fazio
Advisor: Yevgeniy Dodis

Abstract

With more and more content being produced, distributed, and ultimately rendered and consumed in digital form, devising effective Content Protection mechanisms and building satisfactory Digital Rights Management (DRM) systems have become top priorities for the Publishing and Entertaining Industries.

To help tackle this challenge, several cryptographic primitives and constructions have been proposed, including mechanisms to securely distribute data over a unidirectional insecure channel (Broadcast Encryption), schemes in which leakage of cryptographic keys can be traced back to the leaker (Traitor Tracing), and techniques to combine revocation and tracing capabilities (Trace-and-Revoke schemes).

In this thesis, we present several original constructions of the above primitives, which improve upon existing DRM-enabling cryptographic primitives along the following two directions:

  1. Widening their scope of applicability e.g., by considering models taking into accounts usability issues typical of the DRM setting; and
  2. Strengthening their security guarantees to higher levels that are standards, for example, in the case of stand-alone encryption.

Our results along the first line of work include the following:

As for the second direction, our contribution can be divided as follows:

Overall, the cryptographic tools developed in this thesis provide more flexibility and more security than existing solutions, and thus offer a better match for the challenges of the DRM setting.