Telecommunications and Coordination Technologies

Information Systems Department, Stern School of Business, NYU

Prof. Arthur Goldberg, Computer Science Department, NYU

Spring 2000

C20.0045001, 3 credits

Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:00 to 3:15 PM, Tisch UC64

Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Computer Systems (C20.0035) or Prof. Goldberg’s permission

Modification history in 2000: 2/1, 2/10, 3/21, 3/23, 3/29, 3/30, 4/3, 4/11

Abstract

This course surveys the major components and functions of electronic communications systems, focusing on computer networks and reviewing telephone and cable television networks.  It discusses the major trends and issues relating to network technologies.  Among the specific topics covered are principles and standards of computer communication, the underlying technologies for communication systems, network protocols and network software.

Readings

Required text: Douglas E. Comer, Ralph E. Droms, Computer Networks and Internets, Hardcover - 590 pages, 2nd edition (January 1999), Prentice Hall; ISBN: 0130836176. $74.00 plus shipping at www.amazon.com.

Additional reference: Andrew Tanenbaum, Computer Networking, Third Edition, 1996, ISBN 0-13-349945-6. The best technical telecommunications and computer networking text that covers all important topics.  It sells for $55.30.

Course Homepage

http://www.cs.nyu.edu/artg/telecom/spring00/index.html

Lectures

Professor

./lecture_notes/lecture_notes.html

Guests

March 2, Cliff Roth, GIST.com and noted Cable Industry Reporter, The US CATV Industry

April 13, Monica Rabotnicoff, PriceWaterhouseCoopers, Stern MBA ’99, The Evolution of the Telecommunications Industry and the Impact of the Internet

Notes from a Fall 99 guest

Bill Russell: NYU-NET: Internetworking inside NYU and between NYU and the World: Status and Plans

Magazine Articles

 

Week

Name

Author

Publication Date

URL Alternate

3

Northern Light

Heidi Brown

17-May-99

article

3

Wireless warrior 

Toni Mack

19-Apr-99

Hardcopy

6

Getting into the Fast Lane 

Scott McCormack

Fall 1999

article

6

Man in the Middle

Geoff Baum, Forbes ASAP

23-Aug-99

Hardcopy

6

The $20 billion crumb

Thomas Easton and Scott Woolley

19-Apr-99

Hardcopy

10

Multimedia Transmissions Are Driving Internet Toward Gridlock

Sara Robinson

8/23/99

New York Times, hardcopy

11

Master of Your Domain 

Scott Woolley 

26-Jul-99

article

14

An Edison for a New Age? 

Dyan Machan

17-May-99

article

Comer Readings and Problem Sets

Assignments following April to be specified precisely as the course proceeds.
 

Week

Date

Topic

Comer sections

 

Questions in Comer due

 

 

 

From

Through

 

1

20-Jan

Preface

 

 

 

 

 

1 – Introduction

1.1

1.6

 

 

 

2 – Motivation and Tools

2.1

2.7

 

2

25-Jan

3 – Transmission Media

3.1

3.12

 

 

27-Jan

4 - Local Asynchronous Communication (RS-232)

4.1

4.3

2: 3, 5; 3: 3, 7

ping_gateway use

traceroute to get

round-trip times.

 

 

 

4.5: 1st paragraph

4.5: 3rd paragraph

 

 

 

 

4.7

4.8: 2nd paragraph

 

 

 

 

4.11

 

 

3

1-Feb

5 - Long Distance Communication (Carriers, Modulation, and Modems)

5.1

5.2: 2nd paragraph

 

 

 

 

5.3

5.8

 

 

3-Feb

 

5.10

5.11

Week 3 articles

4

8-Feb

6 - Packets, Frames, and Error Detection

6.1

6.9

4: 2; 5: 2, 4

 

 

 

6.13

6.14

 

 

10-Feb

7 – LAN Technologies and Network Topology

7.1

7.9

 

 

 

 

7.11

7.14

 

5

15-Feb

8 - Hardware Addressing and Frame Type Identification

8.1

8.6

6: 1, 2; 7: 1, 5

 

 

 

8.7

 

 

 

 

 

8.9

8.10

 

 

 

 

8.12

8.13

 

 

17-Feb

9 - LAN Wiring, Physical Topology, and Interface Hardware

9.1

9.4

Quiz on chapters

3 and 5

 

 

 

9.7

9.13

 

6

22-Feb

11 - Long Distance Digital ConnectionTechnologies 

11.1

11.7

8: 4, 10

 

 

 

11.9

11.10

 

 

24-Feb

 

11.13

11.19

Week 6 articles

 

 

 

11.22

 

 

7

29-Feb

12 - WAN Technologies and Routing

12.1

12.12

11: 2, 4, 8, 9

 

 

 

12.13

 

 

 

 

 

12.17

12.18

 

 

2-Mar

 

13.1

13.4

 

 

 

 

13.6

 

 

 

 

 

13.8

13.9

 

8

7-Mar

 

 

 

Midterm covering all

material through 2-Mar

 

9-Mar

Guest lecture: Cliff Roth, Cable Industry

 

 

 

12: 2, 9

9

21-Mar

13 - Network Ownership, Service Paradigm, and Performance

14 - Protocols and Layering

14.1

14.10.3

 

 

 

 

14.12

 

 

 

23-Mar

15 - Internetworking: Concepts, Architecture, and Protocols

15.1

15.14

 

10

28-Mar

Prof Goldberg Ill

 

 

13: 3, 4, 6

 

30-Mar

15 – Rest Of Internetworking: Concepts, Architecture, and Protocols;16 - IP: Internet Protocol Addresses

16.1

16.5

 

 

 

 

16.7

16.13

 

 

 

 

16.15

16.17

 

11

4-April

18 - IP Datagrams and Datagram Forwarding

18.1

18.11

14: 4

 

 

22 – TCP: Reliable Transport Service

22.1

22.9

 

 

 

 

22.13

22.14

 

 

6-April

23 - Client-Server Interaction

23.1

23.14

 

 

 

 

23.17

 

 

 

 

 

23.19

 

 

12

11 - April

26 - Naming with the Domain Name System

26.1

26.11

18: 7, 8, 10; 22: 3, 6, 7; 23: 4

 

 

 

26.16

 

 

 

13-April

Guest lecture: E-Business in Telecommunications:

The Impact of the Internet on the

Communications Industry, Monica Rabotnicoff, PriceWaterhouseCoopers (ppt)

 

 

 

13

18-April

27 - Electronic Mail Representation and Transfer

27.1

27.17

26: 1, 7, 14

 

20-April

29 - World Wide Web Pages and Browsing

29.12

29.17

27: 3, 6, 7

14

25-April

Guest lecture: Wireless: Warren Melnick, www.kentech.com

 

 

 

 

27-April

34 - Network Security

34.1

34.12

29: 1, 2, 7 

 

 

 

 

 

34: 2, 3 

 

9-May

2:00 – 3:50

 

 

FINAL EXAM

Communications

Email: artg@cs.nyu.edu.

Phone: 998-3014

Home page: www.cs.nyu.edu/cs/faculty/artg

Office: 715 Broadway (across from McDonald’s), Room 711, Computer Science Department

Office hour: Mondays 12:00 to 1:00, or by appointment

Secretary: Lourdes Santana, 998-3026, santana@cims.nyu.edu

Email beacon:  The email beacon, or mail forwarder, enables anyone (usually Prof. Goldberg), to broadcast email to the professor and all students in the class.  It will be used for important announcements.  You must register with the email beacon.  To receive these email broadcasts send an email to 

lyris@forums.nyu.edu, in the message body put:

 

join telecomspring2000 Your-Name telecomspring2000

 

The second telecomspring2000 is the List-Password

 

WEB INTERFACE: To reach the web interface for this list, go to

http://forums.nyu.edu/cgi-bin/nyu.pl?enter=telecomspring2000

 

CONTRIBUTING:

To contribute to the list by email, send a message to:

 

    telecomspring2000@forums.nyu.edu

 

To find out more about Lyris e-mail commands, go to

http://forums.nyu.edu/lyris/help/LyrisEmailCommands.html

Please read email every couple of days to keep up.

Assignments

The assignments are listed below.  Dates may change as the course progresses.
 

Assignment

Date

Graded by

Percent

Midterm

March 7

One week later

20

One 40 minute quiz

Feb. 15

One week later

10

Final exam

May 9

One week later

35

Class participation

 

Half at midterm, other half at end

10

Problem sets

In syllabus

Within a week of being passed in

25

Class participation

Please speak up in class, and help me get to know you.  I will make a seating chart and urge you to sit in the same place regularly so I can help identify you.

Problem sets

The syllabus indicates a set of problems from Comer associated with most lectures.  Some lectures have supplemental problems.  We’ll correct them within a week, usually.

Grades for late problem sets will be penalized twenty percent per week, pro rated.

Intellectual Property Rules for Problem Sets

At least half of each answer must be written in your own words.

Text which is copied from any other source must appear in quotes with as full a reference to the source as possible.  For a book or magazine article provide as many of the following as possible: author, title, article title, date, publisher and page.  For a Web page provide URL, date, title, author.  If you work on your homework with someone else, put down his or her name(s).

No credit will be awarded for answers containing copying without attribution.  Repeated copying without attribution will result in more serious penalties, including failing the course.

Other Problem Set Grading Rules

Often, handwriting is hard to read.  Unless your handwriting is very neat, please write in UPPERCASE, or better yet, type your answers.  Naturally, diagrams can be drawn.  Illegible homework receives no credit.

Please show your reasoning in responding to questions.  I cannot give partial credit and/or help you learn where you might go wrong if you only provide a number for the answer.  Look at my answers—they all show my reasoning.

If you encounter trouble doing your homework, or any other trouble with the course, please let me know so I can try to fix the problem.  It’s much better to call or email and say “I can’t do this problem, please help” than to just pass in answers which say “this problem cannot be done”.